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20121128
20121128
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the issue of civil rights. to support us as councilmembers and the public to know, educate what are our rights. how you make your right to be heard. that's been a wonderful source of support. i will say to my colleagues, to the public, if you have any question about disability access in san francisco, call the mayor's office on disability. i cannot go without saying, it starts from the top. you have the mayor's office on disability. this is an administrative department, funded by the mayor. the mayor gets to check off on the budget. for the three mayors i've had the pleasure to work for, mayor brown, mayor newsom and now mayor lee, they make sure that we have the funds that we need to pursue disability access, that is vital. that is from the top. what we get to do as councilmembers, i'm trying to promote people stepping forward to apply as a council member in the future. we get to try to bridge some of the gaps that ms. jacobson herself did today. across the bay. she sees a need, she tries to bridge the gap. sometimes we need to be angry. that's okay. if we come with respec
of inequality. that is why it is a civil rights issue. those people need choices, but it will have an effect on the individual child and more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say that as well. [applause] >> i would only add standards to that. i think it's important that we as a society, said very clear expectations for what it is. michael is a secretary of state, not in the sense that condoleezza rice was, but as a member of the cabinet there. the secretary of state and the united foundation for education. >> it has been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it is worth traveling across the united states. >> the ultimate compliment. >> the first time i have ever worried about you judging. [laughter] >> he made the point that national security, one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that they recognize it as a moral complex more than anything. and america realizes that they couldn't win these nations in particular. it was a precondition of winning across the globe. if you'll forgive me, but it's the same danger now. the e
: another piece of the expansion of civil rights, the subtle interaction between the supreme court and the popular opinion, the supreme court does respond to popular opinion and therefore, the four publicly embraced referenda that said we are willing -- we and our states want same-sex marriage. that affects the supreme court. >> yes. that's why -- it is an excellent point. that's why these marriage referendums that we just saw in the last election, which for the first time, gay rights advocates won -- all four marriage equality referendums the timing of that was very important because it came just before the supreme court reviewed this. obviously the court is going to look to public opinion to see whether or not the country is ready for same-sex marriage. >> eliot: it is not as though the justice of the court take polls and say 50% is for -- therefore my view of constitutional rights changes. even conservative jurists understand one's sensibility of rights changes as -- there is an evolution. >> over time, it is what
of inequality. that's why it's called a civil rights issue. they need choices. it will have them an effect on the individual child more kids will be better educate and ting will have a effect on the -- so i would say -- [inaudible] [applause] >> i would only add standards. i think it's important as we as a society set expectations for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- not sense that cobbed lee -- condoleezza rice was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation
what they called systematic, widespread, and grave violations of civil rights. they report to torture, prison camps and public executions and urged leaders to resolve the abductions of japanese and other foreign nationals. north koreans kidnapped at least 17 japanese in the 1970s and '806s and only five returned home. the ambassador said they are a global issue. the envoy rejected the resolution and called it a fabrication based on political motivation. delegates from china and russia made it clear they rejected the conclusions of the resolution. analysts with an american satellite imagery firm have other concerns. they s a recent photo showed increase activity around a missile facility in north korea. they warn authorities could be preparing for another launch similar to the one that happened last april. digital globe released the image at the facility in the northwest. the photo was taken last friday. it shows a tents, trucks, and many fuel tanks. digital globe analysts say authorities could carry out a missile launch in the next three weeks. earlier satellite images of the facility
knowing what their civil rights are in terms of their housing. >> chair: thank you. cochair james, and program administrator -- >> i have a two-part question. one part is about the desk clerks and having someone who listen to you if you have a complaint. the complaint goes to management? they know they are trained to de escalate situation? i don't know about the training that desk clerks would have at sros. >> i think that the short answer is, that depends. a lot of nonprofit housing providers have their own training and standards to what desk clerks are trained in. yes, there are nonprofit-run sros, who have well-trained desk clerks. the vast majority are private buildings. they're not huge buildings that are very apparent. that could be 3-4 floors abouve a restaurant. that's just the person hired by the property manager, or have some sort of agreement for trade for work. and the function of that person is often to buzz people in or call 911. we are looking at raising the bar to where some of the training levels are at some of the nonprofit buildings. we have technical p
service and is lauded for his work on education, civil- rights national service, immigration, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and the senate to formally recognize the first 10 days of may as asian-pacific heritage week. one year later, president jimmy
issuu act on that it can backfire in lots of different ways. i am concerned about civil rights, i'm concerned about free speech, i'm concerned about just changing san francisco's style and how we are as a city. and it's something that's very troubling to me to see that. we're a city that actually had -- the publication of city life that naked lunch came out there was a ban about that. the city looks at free speech and expression, we're a beacon of light to other places around the country and sometimes there's weirdness about how we express ourselves but i think that is what is great about san francisco. i have something teed up that i was saving for before, for chris daly when he used the f word in
the decision relatedpxv to the >> president chiu: again that we've considered and housing for broadly and civil rights more broadly. >> i will use an analogy. i was raised in the country. elephant needed to have a pen, and also a stable, you would ask someone where can i get these facilities. you certainly wouldn't expect that person to direct you to a beehive. and a beehive is where worker bees live. and a stable is where you have larger groups of people that could possibly be there. and since, you know, it's been decided that, you know, oftentimes elephants can't live in beehives, that i suggest that perhaps a beehive isn't as valuable to a city that needs an elephant pen. thank you. >> president chiu: thank you. >> i'm going to be using the overhead. this is my son. can i use the overhead? >> president chiu: sfgov-tv. august 14, 2006. i just want to sayƧ&%( [ that we talking about violence versus nudity. i'm not bringing that up. "k about my child seeing nudity, but i'm worried about them seeing guns and i'm also -- we can continue -- we continue to be ignored as mothers and fathers. every
you for the support. although we're finding out in this city a lot of people civic and civil rights are being cut back on. we hope you, the board of supervisors, will be like the board of supervisors who brought forth the medical marijuana that now 25 states enjoy. supervisors to create codes and sros will be coming here december 4. you know sros, you talk about domestic violence, you talk about homophobia, racism. it's inside now. people want to get up from the sheets and run to the street, whether they naked or not. you know the naked truth is that we really want you guys to do what chris daly did. he's the only one that built apartments on the corner of bank burger king. the united states two weeks ago we voted for the president. two weeks today. they emo he that the -- know the united states politicians are working three days a week and no times for the citizens. we don't want you to reflect that. i want to remember you board of supervisors. when ross was the supervisor here you only making 33,000. we voted that youz/( -w would me over 115 so that you could do the work -- to san
in cocoa, florida, for harriette and harry moore, leaders of the civil rights movement in florida. harry moore established the first branch of the naacp in brow ward county, florida, and considered the first martyr of the 1950's era civil rights movement. sadly on christmas night in 1951, the moores were killed by a bomb planted beneath their home. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in strong support of this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes mr. clay from missouri. mr. clay: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i, too, want to join with my colleague from arizona in consideration of h.r. 2338 to name the post office in cocoa, florida, after harry t. and harriette moore. in accordance with committee requirements, h.r. 2338 is co-sponsored by all members of the florida delegation and was reported out of the oversight committee by unanimous consent. it honors the legacy of harry t. and harry moore who both fought tirelessly for civil righ
people and that's a high-tech in equality and that's why i've called it a civil rights issue. those people make choices, but it will have them an affect on individual child or kids would be better educated, and i think you'll have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say school choice. [applause] >> i would only add standards. it's important we as a society said very clear expectations, for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- as a member of the cabinet, secretary of state for education in the united kingdom where i got educated. so i look inward -- i look forward to hearing your questions. >> thank you very much. i just want to say, it's been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach on united. [laughter] >> the ultimate compliment. >> to hear you speak. >> the first time i've ever worried about -- [laughter] >> but you made the point that you're changing things and they also matter -- [inaudible] one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that it recognize this is a moral conflict much than anything else. and america realized tha
lead action. civil rights attorney john buress filed a massive lawsuit against chevron on behalf of 5,000 complaints. and he says it's just the start. >>> we anticipate that we'll have another 5,000 or 6,000 that will file in the near future. >> the lawsuit is designed, one to they would them accountable for what they did. to have them acknowledge their misdeeds and not engage in coverup and to fully compensate the individuals who have been damaged financially by this. >> chevron says it set up a claims process, including help centers to compensate victims. they call the lawsuit unnecessary and pledge to fight it vigorously. reid says chevron offered to pay her $500, but shed to join others in the legal action instead. she says she wants chevron to make changes. >> i think it would minimize and cut down a lot of fires. and also to have regular checks. so this can be prevented. zbl now john says he's not sure how much money they will be seeking but he expects it to be quite a bit more than what chevron has been offering folks. chevron has declined to reveal how much money it's paid out
openly gay supersraoeup super -- supervisor. family members say the two men were trail blazers for civil rights. and the dispair on november 27, 1978 within they were gunned down by former supervisor dan white has now turned into hope. >> we will not stop until we have equality across the globe and that is what tonight means. >> reporter: with candles in hand, hundreds marched from city hall to the castro reflecting on the impact of the assassination. >> it mean as great deal. it means our freedom. >> i met mayor mascone the year before he was assassinated -- >> reporter: this man tells us he was only 19 at the time. he said these two leaders gave the gay community the courage to deal with the aids epidemic. >> that lit a fire under myself and my fellow activists. >> reporter: the mood was upbeat when the march ended. a memorial has been set up to celebrate the life of harvey milk. reporting live here in san francisco, amber lee, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> credit card numbers hacked from a bay area bar. >> we have $700 charge at staples. >> reporter: what the business is doing now to prote
super -- supervisor. family members say the two men were trail blazers for civil rights. and the dispair on november 27, 1978 within they were gunned down by former supervisor dan white has now turned into hope. >> we will not stop until we have equality across the globe and that is what tonight means. >> reporter: with candles in hand, hundreds marched from city hall to the castro reflecting on the impact of the assassination. >> it mean as great deal. it means our freedom. >> i met mayor mascone the year before he was assassinated -- >> reporter: this man tells us he was only 19 at the time. he said these two leaders gave the gay community the courage to deal with the aids epidemic. >> that lit a fire under myself and my fellow activists. >> reporter: the mood was upbeat when the march ended. a memorial has been set up to celebrate the life of harvey milk. reporting live here in san francisco, amber lee, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> credit card numbers hacked from a bay area bar. >> we have $700 charge at staples. >> reporter: what the business is doing now to protect >>> new video this ev
not going to talk about that. i've heard civil rights leader come out and say entitlements are very important to the black community. the president owes the black community a lot, you know, with his re-election and all so don't touch those. so the president is under a lot of pressure isn't he? >> well, i don't think so. here's why. i think the way that we've been having this conversation is a little bit antiquated. what i mean by that is this whole notion of going out and talking to people in meetings and things like that and then having talking points and having us here debating on air, that is a really old school way of having this kind of conversation. with the kind of technology we have available what i would like to see the white house do is just simply put together an argument like an informercial complete with pie charts and things of that nature, visual aids so the american people can see for themselves that this isn't just about, you know, my side winning, getting what it wants versus your side. this is about the american economy and where it is headed and what needs to hap
and opportunities for all. equality before the law and civil rights. that is a psychic -- a society in which i want to live and my children to be able to live in of. there is no guarantee we will live happily ever after. the era of globalization -- we need to cooperate more than ever to defend our democracy. and our society. we cannot take what has been achieved for granted. we need to continue fighting for it on a daily basis. other parts of the world are developing. i mentioned at the beginning of my speech that in the g-20 and with its creation, it took the necessary consequence to involved in emerging regions of the world and the political system to rule the world but those parts of the world we consider today that the emerging countries are not sharing our values. the lowest salary, the lowest respect for individual rights, the los respect for freedom of speech, for example by closing the internet. it the lowest standard of what the are considering you in the united states in europe as our basic values and our standards representing our basic values. the best means to compete economically agai
. i think he would think we still have challenges. he was focused on many civil justices, obviously gay and lesbian rights. but also immigration he started to connect the dots. i think that their deaths informed the city of san francisco to people sometimes to rise up and say, as san francisco values. but we know what we're about. we know we push the envelope and we've always been rewarded for that. >> now, harvey milk had a movie made about him. you were in that movie but again there's the mascone center named after the mayor. does the mayor get tricked in all of this. does he take a backseat to harvey milk? >> i think it's true that you know harvey was in a position to lead a movement. which is some what different than what george's circumstances were. but without his alliance and without his friendship and his learning curb sort to speak, he and harvey were both on a learning curb about -- curve about what could happen. you're only as good as your friends. i do think that his son jonathan has really gifted the city with a wonderful production about his remembrances as a 12-year-
, in syria's civil war. what happened? >> that's right, wolf. syrian activists say at least 45 people were killed in two car bombings outside the capital of damascus. that city has been a sanctuary for pro-regime forced to flee their homes. the rebels have claimed to down three fighter jets in the past 24 hours. we'll speak with cnn's arwa damon from northern syria later this hour. a federal judge is ordering tobacco companies to publicly admit they deceived americans about the dangers of smoking. the court ruled big tobacco should print on the box and advertisements. it's not clear if tobacco companies will appeal this decision. and the self-described king of motivation has died at the age of 86 years old. zig ziglar best known for his seminars and more than two dozen books on salesmanship. he died in dallas after getting pneumonia. he had quite an influence. he had 30 books or so over the course of his life. >> quite a following. thanks very much, lisa, for that. >>> republican raise eyebrows when he said he might break the anti-tax pledge. that statement could also draw him into getting
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
on the same but we put them on it and you're probably in the next genraition of those radios right now and by the way -- there was a man here who preceded the mayor. it was then called the chief administrative officer and rudy rothenberg and incredible civil servant and i worked with him on this building. in fact i drew this building. i had architecture work as a midship man and if i find it i'm going to give it to you. we also as a result of that we subsumed the department of public health ambulance into the fire department and should have been done years ago and
lawyers from myanmar and help revise its civil code. myanmar's reform government is led by civilians, but the constitution still reserves one-quarter of seats in pal meant for the military. during wednesday's speech, the chief justice said all citizens have the right to equality, freedom and justice. but he stopped short of saying whether the constitution should be changed. >> and that wraps up our bulletin from bangkok. scientists are raising the alarm over another source of global warming. that comes from perm ma frost which scientists say is melting releasing greenhouse gasses trapped under the ice. the authors say perma frost contains huge amounts of carbon from the melting of organic matter. perma frost covers almost a quarter of the northern hemisphere including large parts of siberia and canada. it could release as much as 105 giga tons of co2 before the end of the year. >> perma frost tends to be very durable but when it melts, tarrant county infrastructure gets soft. >> the scientists warn emissions from perma frost could start within the next few decades. >>> japanese offic
. >>> american civil liberties union is suing the pentagon to remove all restrictions on women in battle, calling the current strate strategy discriminatory. >> you're one of 12 kids, is that right? >> i'm one of 11 kids. >> well, you're probably catholic, right? we're just hillbillys. >>> reportedly lost his job over the map app. >>> premiere of "the hobbit" is getting under way. new z new zealand has unveiled a hobbit-themed airplane. of course, real hobbit fans only fly virgin. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." we're in washington where lawmakers have just 34 days left to reach a deal before the a potentiaff deadline. that ning funded by cbs confidence is slowly starting to fade away and major is with us >>> major garret is with us in the studio. what's happening? >> americans might say, look, it feels like time is running out. they would be correct. nal republicwhite house and ote mostional republicans say they'll devote most if not all of this week, and things are slowing down and we're looking at a potential fiscal cliff stalemate. >> desmight republicans to put higher tax revenue from the
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)